How To Avoid Eviction After The Georgia Eviction Moratorium Is Over

September 15, 2021 | Daniel Dewitt

georgia eviction moratorium

The Georgia eviction moratorium has ended, which means landlords can start evicting people for not paying their rent once again. Thankfully, there are several things you can do to delay and entirely avoid eviction at this stage. Look at the steps below to see which may work with your situation.

Follow These Steps to Avoid Eviction Once The Georgia Eviction Moratorium is Over

1. Understand The Eviction Notice

Before anything else happens, you will receive an eviction notice when your landlord decides to kick you out. It states the reason for the eviction and the period you have to comply or move. You can receive two kinds of eviction notices in Georgia. These are as follows:

  • Demand or Termination Notice — You get this notice if you fail to pay rent or violate the lease or agreement. It gives you a timeframe to move out of the property. Georgia law doesn't state how many days your landlord needs to provide you. But if you don't adhere to the notice, you might be served with an eviction lawsuit, as per the Georgia Code Title 44 Chapter 7 Article 3 § 44-7-50.
  • Sixty-Day Quit Notice — If you have a month-to-month rental contract, the notice gives you 60 days to move out, according to the Georgia Code Title 44 Article 1 § 44-7-7.

Don't panic too much. Sure, the Georgia eviction moratorium had been providing a certain level of protection which you are deprived of now. But even though these notices are scary, it isn't the end of the world. You might not be immediately evicted if the notice period ends. After all, eviction is a legal procedure with wait times totaling weeks and even months if your landlord files a lawsuit.

That in itself is a decent delay. But if you'd like something more concrete, it's worth following our other steps too.

2. Know Common Defenses to Eviction Cases in Georgia

Since the Georgia eviction moratorium has ended, you might get a notice to show up in the court after a prolonged period of not paying your rent. If you’ve got one of those notices, you want to go armed with your best defenses. Some common defenses for eviction lawsuits in Georgia are as follows:

  1. Your landlord is attempting eviction using "self-help" processes — Landlords aren't allowed to evict you without a court order. Shutting off utilities (O.C.G.A. Title 44 Chapter 7 44-7-14.1), changing locks, taking your belongings, and removing the front door are not permittable eviction methods.
  2. Your landlord is evicting you because you didn't pay rent — You can have a legal defense in certain circumstances:
    • You've now paid in full — Paying your rent in full within seven days of the eviction lawsuit letter will stop the eviction. You can only stop eviction in this manner once in twelve months, according to O.C.G.A. § 44-7-52.
    • Your landlord hasn't made any necessary repairs — They must keep the rental property in good order. If they don't keep it up to scratch, they are legally not allowed to evict you. You can arrange for the repair and ensure the amount is deducted from your rent.
  3. Your landlord is evicting you for discriminatory reasons — Under the Georgia Fair Housing Act and the federal Fair Housing Act, your landlord cannot evict you based on national origin, familial status, gender, race, sexuality, disability, or religion. You can use the Fair Housing Act as your defense in this case.
georgia eviction moratorium

3. Consult The Georgia Landlord Tenant Handbook

There aren't many laws regulating eviction activities in the state. But you can use the Georgia Landlord Tenant Handbook to challenge your case. It's published by the State of Georgia and gives you a lot of advice on commonly-asked questions.

4. Get Extra Cash to Afford Your Rent

If you're being evicted due to unpaid rent, and you can't afford to cover it with your paycheck this month, because you have other bills stacked up, and the Georgia eviction moratorium is now over, you can get cash for your car title with car title pawns.

What Is A Car Title Pawn?

A car title pawn is a a short-term loan which doesn’t require long-term commitment, hence, easier to pay off. To get it, all you need is to be 18 years of age or older and outright own a vehicle. You must be able to provide a valid documentation to prove that you meet both requirements.

The process can be over and done with in as little as half an hour, and you can even gain approval if you have bad credit!

Follow the steps below to get a car title pawn with Georgia Auto Pawn, Inc.:

  1. Start by filling in the online inquiry form or contacting your local Georgia Auto Pawn, Inc. storefront via the phone.
  2. If you submitted the form, somebody from your nearest shop front will call you ASAP (typically within a matter of minutes). They will explain the required documents, describe the rest of the process, and answer any questions to ensure you're 100% happy before continuing.
  3. After the conversation, go to your nearest Georgia Auto Pawn, Inc. store with your driver's license (or a different kind of state-issued photo ID), your vehicle, and your vehicle's lien-free title.
  4. They will guide you through some simple paperwork and answer subsequent questions if you are eligible for approval.
  5. After that, you could receive the money you need on the same day. And yes, you leave with your vehicle and can continue to use it as you please throughout the repayment period.

car title pawn cash

Get a Car Title Pawn Today

Being vulnerable to financial issues associated with rent may be frustrating. However, it doesn’t mean that there’s no way out. If you have received an eviction notice and have no funds to cover your rent, car title pawns online might be an option worth considering.

Get the process started today by filling out a short intake form on our website – and in as little as 30 minutes, you might get approved for as much as $15,000 cash with Georgia Auto Pawn, Inc.